The Stages of Scrapbook Obsession

They say the first step toward overcoming an obsession is acknowledging that you have one, and it usually takes a defining moment to recognize it. For scrapbookers, maybe you feel the sunrise on your face and realize that you worked on your album throughout the night without any sleep. Maybe you’re spending so much time taking pictures that your grandkids start to call you “Grandma Camera.” Maybe you’ve been told you’re mumbling in your sleep to “pass you the Tape Runner” and you’re starting to find paper scraps and Foam Square backs in your shoes.

How did something that began as an innocent hobby turn into a full-blown, awesomely fun addiction? There is a natural process to becoming a scrap-addict — it’s a slow journey, one that happens something like this…

The First Timer

BMS_Instructions_Step5_RGB.jpgNobody is born trimming paper, placing stickers and arranging layouts. But, that doesn’t mean that it isn’t in our blood. Some of us are born into a scrapbooking family, while others discover it organically on their own. No matter which it is, nobody ever forgets their first time placing pictures on a page. You experience that immediate rush of creativity and realize just how endless the possibilities are as you feel the smile spreading on your face.

Once the project is over, you understand why people do this as a hobby. The sense of satisfaction is matched only by the sense of pride you have as you look at your completed album. You make a mental note of this feeling, but don’t think much more of it.

The Occasional Artist

CM_Q2Catalog3025_retouchedAfter this initial rush, you keep scrapbooking in the back of your mind until the next big event in your life. Maybe it’s a holiday, a milestone for a family member or anything else particularly noteworthy and you catch yourself thinking, “Hey, this would be great to scrapbook!” So, you hastily take out your phone or camera and snap a few quick pictures of the event. You don’t pay much attention to the pictures you are taking and how they will look on the page; you just try to take as many as you can to avoid missing the moment.

A few days later, you set out to create the scrapbook. You’ve printed all the photos from the day in question and you get to work creating a layout. Whether you’re following a sketch or going based on your imagination, you’re able to create a finished product that you are proud of, and you can’t wait until the next big life event comes around so you can further perfect your skills.

The Weekender

CM_CatalogQ35198_retouched.jpgSuddenly, you don’t wait for big life milestones for a reason to scrapbook anymore. You’ve gone out of your way to find the extraordinary in the ordinary and have started to scrapbook more and more. Your camera is getting used often and you’re starting to see more of your expendable income go toward papers, punches, stickers and other supplies.

At this point, you would start to consider scrapbooking a hobby of yours. You would rather spend your weekends with a 12-inch Trimmer and Tape Runner than anywhere else. The challenge of coming up with new and exciting layouts keeps you hooked, and you love pushing yourself to new creative limits.

The Daily Deviant

At this point, you’ve definitely fallen in love. You’re spending a good amount of free time hunched over the table in your craft room (yes, you have a craft room now). Friends and family members are all still adjusting to your new passion, but when they see the beautiful layout you made them that celebrates their latest birthday party, all their concerns are blown aside by gratitude and awe.

You’re still in control. You aren’t scrapbooking this much because you have to, but because you want to. The thrill that comes from finishing an album is the fuel that keeps you scrapbooking every day, and you continue to improve your skillset with each and every layout you make. You’ve improved drastically since your first project, and at this point you’re head-over-heels.

The Scrapaholic

Intro_Albums_RGBYou don’t want to stop… ever. Daylight? Never heard of it. Your friends and family sometimes claim they go days without seeing you, relying on only the sound of the Border Maker Cartridge punching away from your craft cave to assure them that you’re still in there. The walls of your craft room look like they belong to a conspiracy theorist with all the sketches that are taped up there as you plan layouts, carefully selecting the perfect design for your page. But you don’t care. The only thing that matters is the page in front of you.

You couldn’t be happier. You have found your true passion in life — what you were BORN to do. Everything that you see in your daily life turns into a mental photograph that you then place into a mental layout. You are fully obsessed, but more importantly, you feel alive.

Keep On Scrapbooking

No matter how far along the path you are, we’ve got your back – we believe there is no such thing as too much scrapbooking (although, if you haven’t seen the sunlight in a while, it might be a good idea to take your crafting outside). Scrapbooking is a fun hobby that can be shared with anyone, and in the grand scheme of things, there are far worse things that you could be “addicted” to. So, scrap on!

What stage do you think you’re at right now? Comment below!

4 thoughts on “The Stages of Scrapbook Obsession

  1. I’m borderline, not telling which ones, however I did skip a few when I discovered scrapbooking with Creative Memories back in 1999!

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  2. I’m a scrapaholic at heart. The only difficulty is working in the scrapbooking itself into a hectic schedule. My friends and family joke that I have enough CM product to start a store in my spare bedroom! They’re not wrong–we just won’t let hubby be aware.

    Like

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